Home Protests Pro-Palestine protests at Johns Hopkins University raise safety concerns

Pro-Palestine protests at Johns Hopkins University raise safety concerns

Amid the unrest, university president Ron Daniels called for an end to the protest, citing concerns about campus safety and university values.

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Friday marks the fifth day of anti-Palestinian protests at Johns Hopkins University, as tensions rise as the camp continues to expand.

“It’s getting worse every day,” said one student protester who spoke on condition of anonymity. “We will not stop until our voice is heard.

Amid the unrest, university president Ron Daniels called for an end to the protest, citing concerns about campus safety and university values.

“We understand the importance of free speech, but we must do so in a manner that respects the safety and well-being of all members of our community,” President Daniels said in a press release.

The anonymous Jewish student expressed his concerns after the attack on campus the day before. “What do you think? That you want more Jewish students on campus to attack? What are you waiting for?” he said, urging President Daniels to intervene immediately.

President Daniels addressed protest organizers and participants Wednesday, calling the encampment problematic and inconsistent with the university’s core values. He said the university is prepared to take appropriate disciplinary and legal action if necessary.

“We respect the right to protest peacefully, but we have an obligation to intervene when it disrupts the normal functioning of our institution and threatens the safety of our students,” President Daniels stressed.

Resident professor Charles Village and Zachary Berger see this protest as part of a historical continuum. He compared it to past student protests at Hopkins, including the civil rights protests of the 1960s and the South African walkout of the 1980s.

“This is in the great tradition of student protests that have happened at Hopkins,” Dr. Schmidt said.

“It’s a testament to our students’ commitment to social justice and activism.”

Baltimore Mayor Brandon Scott acknowledged his communication with university officials but emphasized the students’ right to protest.

“We believe in people’s right to protest. It’s their First Amendment right,” Mayor Scott said. “However, we are monitoring the situation closely and if there is any credible threat of violence, we will take appropriate action to ensure the safety of all involved.

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